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2.2  Health and Environmental Safety Policies

2.2.1        Alcohol and Drug Prevention Program Policy

ALCOHOL AND DRUG PREVENTION PROGRAM POLICY

Effective Date:

May 8, 2017

Policy Number:

II – 2.2.1

Supersedes:

Not Applicable.

Issuing Authority:

President

Responsible Officer:

Vice President for Student Affairs

Applicability:

All members of the Canisius College community.

History:

 


PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy is to adopt and implement a program to educate and prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol.

POLICY

In accordance with the Canisius College commitment to providing a healthy and productive educational environment and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, it is the policy of Canisius College to annually inform the campus community about the college’s policies on drugs and alcohol and about the health risks associated with their use.

The abuse of alcohol and the use of illegal drugs by members of the Canisius community are incompatible with the goals of an academic institution.  In order to ensure that alcohol and illegal drugs do not interfere with the goals of the college, substance abuse programs have been developed which apply to the college as both an educational institution and a workplace.  The programs are designed to:

  • Establish and enforce clear policies for employees and students that promote an educational environment free from the abuse of alcohol and illegal drugs.
  • Educate all members of the campus community about the health risks associated with the use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol.
  • Create a campus environment that promotes and reinforces healthy, responsible living and respect for community and campus standards and regulations.
  • Provide a reasonable level of care for individuals experiencing chemical use and abuse problems through counseling, treatment and referral.

Canisius College prohibits the unauthorized possession, use, manufacture, distribution, or sale of alcoholic beverages by its employees or students on its property or as part of any of its activities. Further, while on its property or as part of any college activity employees and students are prohibited from using drugs, possessing drugs or drug paraphernalia and from selling or otherwise distributing drugs.

Violations of these policies will result in immediate sanctions consistent with the college’s employee and student disciplinary procedures, college policies and regulations, and local, state and federal law. This may include but is not limited to counseling, mandatory participation in an appropriate rehabilitation program, fines, participation in community service, unpaid suspension from employment, loss of certain campus privileges, termination of employment, and/or referral for prosecution.  Student disciplinary action may include the applicable disciplinary sanctions described above and/or suspension or expulsion from the residence halls or the college.  The Canisius College Student Handbook, available in the Griff Center, Old Main 013, and on MyCanisius provides a complete listing of rules of the Community Standards and of the student disciplinary procedures.

The college’s Alcohol and Drug Prevention Program is reviewed annually by the Office of Student Life to determine effectiveness and to implement changes (if needed) to ensure that the College’s disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced.  The college’s review includes a determination as to: (a) the number of drug- and alcohol-related violations and fatalities occurring on the Canisius college campuses or as part of college-sanctioned activities that are reported to campus officials; and, (b) the number and types of sanctions the college imposed on students and employees as a result of such violations or fatalities.

DEFINITIONS

Alcohol or Alcoholic Beverage—any liquid suitable for drinking by human beings, except prescription drugs or over-the-counter medications, which contains one-half of one percent or more of alcohol by volume.

Controlled Substance— a drug, substance, or immediate precursor as identified in Articles 220 and 221 of NY Penal Law; or a drug or other substance, or immediate precursor, included in schedule I, II, III, IV, or V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as amended).

Public Places—residence hall entrances and lobbies, lounges, hallways, and stairways, or common grounds of the college to which the general public by specific or implied invitation has access and in which an individual could have no reasonable expectation of privacy.

PROCEDURES/GUIDELINES

Federal Student Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Law Violations

As prescribed in section 484(r) of the Higher Education Act, a student who, during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving any Federal grant, loan, or work assistance, is convicted of any offense under any Federal or State law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance shall not be eligible to receive any additional grant, loan, or work assistance from the date of that conviction for the period of time specified in the following table:

 

Sale of Illegal Drugs

Possession of Illegal Drugs

1st offense

1 year from date of conviction

2 years from date of conviction

2nd offense

2 years from date of conviction

Indefinite period

3+ offenses

Indefinite period

Indefinite period

(If the student was convicted of both possessing and selling illegal drugs, and the periods of ineligibility are different, the student will be ineligible for the longer period.)

Students denied eligibility for an indefinite period can regain it only after successfully completing an approved rehabilitation program or if a conviction is reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on the record.  In such cases, the nature and dates of the remaining convictions will determine when the student regains eligibility.

Student Responsibilities if Convicted During Period of Enrollment

If a student is convicted of a drug offense after receiving Federal aid, they must notify the Office of Student Records and Financial Services immediately.  If a student has been convicted of a drug offense while applying to receive Title IV Federal financial aid, they are required to report the conviction on item number 23 of the FAFSA.

Criminal Sanctions

The unlawful possession, use, abuse or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol is punishable by sanctions imposed by the US Government and by the state of New York.  Where appropriate or necessary, the College will cooperate fully with the law enforcement agencies.

State Criminal Penalties

Information about New York State statutes and applicable penalties for violations can be found in the library and by contacting Canisius Public Safety at Ext. 2330.

Federal Penalties for Illicit Drugs

The following are federal trafficking penalties for illegal drugs took under the Controlled Substance Acts (CSA).

CSA I and II Penalties

For possession of 10–99 gram (gm) or 100–999 gm mixture of methamphetamine or PCP; 100–999 gm mixture of heroin; 500–4,999 gm mixture of cocaine; 5–49 gm mixture of cocaine base; 1–10 gm mixture of LSD; 40–399 gm mixture of fentanyl; 10–99 gm mixture of fentanyl analogue, the penalty is:

First offense: not less than five years or more than 40 years of imprisonment; if death or serious injury occurs, not less than 20 years of imprisonment or more than life; a fine of not more than $2 million for individuals or $5 million for other than individual.

Second offense: not less than 10 years of imprisonment or more than life; if death or serious injury occurs, not less than life imprisonment; a fine of not more than $4 million for individuals, $10 million for other than individual.

For possession of 100 gm or more, or one kg or more mixture of methamphetamine or PCP; one kg or more mixture of heroin; five kg or more mixture of cocaine; 50 gm or more mixture of cocaine base; 10 gm or more mixture of LSD; 400 gm or more mixture of fentanyl; 100 gm or more mixture of fentanyl analogue; the penalty is:

First offense: not less than 10 years of imprisonment or more than life; if death or serious injury occurs, not less than 20 years of imprisonment or more than life; a fine of not more than $4 million for individuals, or $10 million if other than individual.

Second offense: not less than 20 years of imprisonment or more than life; if death or serious injury occurs, not less than life imprisonment; a fine of not more than $8 million for individuals, $20 million for other than individual.

For other drugs, not including marijuana, hashish, or hash oil, the penalty is:

First offense: not more than 20 years of imprisonment; if death or serious injury occurs, not less than 20 years of imprisonment or more than life; a fine of $1 million for individuals, $5 million for other than individual.

Second offense: not more than 30 years of imprisonment; if death or serious injury occurs, life imprisonment; a fine of $2 million individuals, $10 million for other than individual.

CSA III, IV, and V Penalties

For CSA III drugs, not more than five years of imprisonment: a fine of not more than $250,000 for individuals, or

$1 million for other than individual.

Second offense: penalties double that of first offense.

For CSA IV drugs:

First offense: not more than three years of imprisonment; a fine of not more than $250,000 for individuals, or

$1 million for other than individual.

Second offense: penalties double that of first offense.

For CSA V drugs:

First offense: not more than one year of imprisonment; a fine of not more than $100,000 for individuals, or $250,000 for other than individual.

Second offense: penalties double that of first offense.

Marijuana, Hashish, and Hashish Oil

For possession of 1,000 kilogram (kg) or more, or 1,000 or more plants, of marijuana or mixture containing discernible quantity: 

First offense: not less than 10 years of imprisonment, not more than life imprisonment. If death or serious injury occurs, not less than 20 years of imprisonment, not more than life imprisonment; a fine of not more than $4 million for individuals, $10 million for other than individual.

Second offense: not less than 20 years of imprisonment or not more than life imprisonment; if death or serious injury occurs, not less than life imprisonment; a fine of not more than $8 million for individuals, $20 million for other than individual.

For possession of 100 kg to 1,000 kg, or 100–999 plants, of marijuana or mixture containing discernible quantity: 

First offense: not less than five years of imprisonment, not more than 40 years of imprisonment. If death or serious injury occurs, not less than 20 years of imprisonment, not more than life imprisonment; a fine of not more than $2 million for individuals, $5 million for other than individual.

Second offense: not less than 10 years of imprisonment or more than life imprisonment; if death or serious injury occurs, not less than life imprisonment; a fine of not more than $4 million for individuals, $10 million for other than individual.

For possession of 50 to 100 kg, or 50–99 plants, of marijuana; 10 to 100 kg hashish; or 1 to 100 kg hashish oil: First offense: not more than 20 years of imprisonment. If death or serious injury occurs, not less than 20 years of imprisonment, not more than life imprisonment; a fine of $1 million for individuals, $5 million for other than individual.

Second offense: not more than 30 years of imprisonment. If death or serious injury occurs, life imprisonment, a fine of $2 million for individuals and $10 million for other than an individual.

For possession of under 50 kg of marijuana, less than 10 kg of hashish, less than 1 kg of hashish oil:

First offense: not more than five years of imprisonment; a fine of not more than $250,000 for individuals, $1 million for other than individual.

Second offense: not more than 10 years of imprisonment; a fine of not more than $500,000 for individuals, $2 million for other than individual.

Health Risks of Alcohol and Illicit Drugs

Canisius is committed to educating members of the community on alcohol abuse and other drug use. Teaching and learning can be impaired by alcohol and drug use. The college, therefore, has an explicit concern for the alcohol and drug use of its students, faculty, and staff.

Alcohol — Alcohol consumption causes a number of changes in behavior. Even small amounts significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely. Low to moderate amounts of alcohol can increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including harassment and assault. There is an increase in violence associated with alcohol use including suicide, homicide, and sexual violence. Other negative effects include alcohol poisoning which requires hospital emergency room treatment. Long term health effects include high blood pressure, heart disease, liver disease, cancer, stroke and memory and learning problems. Alcohol use can lead to anxiety and depression, social problems, lost productivity, family problems and economic instability.

Cannabis (Marijuana, Hashish) — Users of marijuana can experience increased heart rate, dry mouth, and throat and increased appetite. Smoking marijuana irritates the lungs and can lead to chronic cough, phlegm production, and lung infections. Some research has identified a link between marijuana use and increased risk for mental illnesses such as depression, psychosis, anxiety and personality disorders. Additional research suggests that marijuana use affects brain development when used by adolescents and young adults. In this age group there is a decline in cognitive functioning that could be permanent.

In 2014 New York State passed the Compassionate Care Act, which allows the use of non-smokeable marijuana for individuals with identified medical conditions that are severely debilitating or life threatening for which marijuana is likely to be therapeutic or palliative. Use of medical marijuana at work or school can threaten productivity, work quality, personal and work place safety.

Heroin—is an illegal addictive opiate associated with very high incidents of overdose. Heroin usage and death from heroin overdose is an epidemic in Erie County and the United States. Illegal use of heroin has increased in both men and women, all age groups and all socioeconomic groups. The greatest risk factor of heroin addiction is addiction to opioid painkillers. Heroin can cause slow, shallow breathing, coma and death. It is typically injected but can also be snorted or smoked. Those who inject heroin are at risk of serious long term viral infections such as HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and bacterial infections of the skin, bloodstream and heart. There is no control over the purity of street heroin so the user is never sure of the amount of drug or drugs they are using. Heroin is often mixed with acetyl fentanyl, another very powerful opioid. It can be 5 to 15 times stronger than heroin and can lead to a more rapid onset of overdose that is more difficult to reverse using accepted medical treatment and Narcan.

Prescription Opioid— Opioid pain killers, such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, lortab, vicodin or other opiate derivatives, either medically prescribed or illicit use, can lead to physical and psychological dependency. Opiate pain medication has been identified as a risk factor and possible gateway drugs for heroin use. Health effects from opiates can include drowsiness, anxiety, nausea, mood swings, impaired judgment, delayed response or reaction, and emotional numbness.  Use of opiates while at work or school can threaten productivity, work quality, personal safety and the safety of co-workers, fellow students and the entire campus community.

Hallucinogens—Lysergic acid (LSD), mescaline, and psilocybin cause illusions and hallucinations. The physical effects may include dilated pupils, elevated body temperature, increased heart rate and blood pressure, loss of appetite, sleeplessness and tremors. The user may experience panic, confusion, suspicion, anxiety, and loss of control. Delayed effects, or flashback, can occur even when use has ceased.

Phencyclidine (PCP) —interrupts the functions of the neocortex, the section of the brain that controls the intellect and keeps instincts in check. Because the drug blocks pain receptors, violent PCP episodes may result in self-inflicted injuries. The effects of PCP vary, but users frequently report a sense of distance and estrangement. Speech is incoherent, coordination worsens, and senses are dulled. In later stages of chronic use, users often exhibit paranoid and violent behavior and experience hallucinations.

Cocaine/Crack—Cocaine users often have a stuffy, runny nose with eczema around the nostrils and possible perforation of the nasal septum. Immediate effects of cocaine include dilated pupils and elevated blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature. Crack or freebase rock cocaine is extremely addictive, and its effects are felt within 10 seconds. Crack and cocaine can cause delirium, hallucinations, blurred vision, severe chest pain, muscle spasms, convulsions, and even death.

Synthetic Cathinones (“Bath Salts”) —The term “bath salts” refers to an emerging family of drugs containing one or more synthetic chemicals related to cathinone, an amphetamine-like stimulant found naturally in the Khat plant. Reports of severe intoxication and dangerous health effects associated with the use of bath salts have made these drugs a serious and growing public health and safety issue. Bath salts are typically taken orally, inhaled, or injected, with the worst outcomes being associated with snorting or needle injection. The synthetic cathinones in bath salts can produce euphoria and increased sociability and sex drive, but some users experience paranoia, agitation, and hallucinatory delirium; some even display psychotic and violent behavior, and deaths have been reported in several instances.

MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly) —MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine), popularly known as ecstasy or, more recently, as Molly, is a synthetic, psychoactive drug that has similarities to both the stimulant amphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline. MDMA is taken orally, usually as a capsule or tablet. It produces feelings of increased energy, euphoria, emotional warmth and empathy toward others, and distortions in sensory and time perception. Health effects include increased heart rate and blood pressure, which are particularly risky for people with circulatory problems or heart disease. MDMA users may experience other symptoms such as muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating. Some heavy MDMA users experience long-lasting confusion, depression, sleep abnormalities, and problems with attention and memory.

Barbiturates—In small doses, barbiturates produce calmness, relaxed muscles and lowered anxiety. Larger doses cause slurred speech, staggering gait and altered perception. Very large doses, or doses taken in combination with other central nervous system depressants (e.g., alcohol), may cause respiratory depression, coma and even death. A person who uses barbiturates may have poor muscle control, appear drowsy or drunk, become confused, irritable, or inattentive, or have slowed reactions.

Amphetamines—Amphetamines, methamphetamines or other stimulants can cause increased heart and respiratory–rates, elevated blood pressure and dilated pupils. Larger doses cause rapid or irregular heartbeat, tremors and physical collapse. An amphetamine injection creates a sudden increase in blood pressure that can result in stroke, high fever, heart failure and death. An individual using amphetamines might begin to lose weight, have the sweats and appear restless, anxious, moody and unable to focus. Extended use may produce psychosis, including hallucinations, delusions and paranoia.

Designer Drugs—Designer drugs are synthetic chemical modifications of older drugs of abuse that are designed and manufactured in covert laboratories and sold at great profit for recreational use.  These drugs can be several hundred to several thousand times stronger than the drugs they are designed to imitate.  Designer drugs similar to opiates include fentanyl, demerol, and “china white.”  The narcotic analogs of designer drugs can cause symptoms such as those seen in Parkinson's disease - uncontrollable tremors, drooling, impaired speech, paralysis and irreversible brain damage.  Analogs of amphetamines and methamphetamines cause nausea, blurred vision, chills or sweating and faintness.  Psychological effects include anxiety, depression and paranoia.  Withdrawal problems include sweating, diarrhea, fever, insomnia, irritability, nausea and vomiting, and muscle and joint pain.

Please note the above list is only a sampling of drugs, and by no means a complete one. Non-labeled use of prescription drugs, abuse of prescription drugs, unsafe use of prescription drugs, club drugs, nicotine, as well as inhalants are other drugs that pose health risks. For a complete list, go to the National Institute on Drug Abuse web site at http://www.drugabuse.gov/. All members of the Canisius community are urged to familiarize themselves with the specific policies on alcohol and drug use. Additional information about the health risks associated with use and abuse can be found in the library, the Student Health Center, and the Counseling Center.  Information about New York State statutes and applicable penalties for violations can be found in the library and by contacting Canisius Public Safety at Ext. 2330.

Confidential Assistance

The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provides professional confidential help and referral to persons troubled by their own or another’s use of alcohol or drugs. Their website address is: www.cfsbny.org/programs/eap.  Call 716-681-4300 to schedule an appointment or if assistance is needed in accessing the website.

The group health insurance plans sponsored by the college for employees and their eligible dependents provide inpatient detoxifications coverage and outpatient visits for alcohol and substance abuse counseling.  For names of approved counselors, co-pays, limits and further information, please contact Human Resources. The student sickness and accidents plans provide coverage for alcohol and substance abuse as mandated by New York State.

In addition to the campus and health plan options, several local agencies provide confidential help. They are as follows:

Additional resources faculty and staff may utilize to help Canisius College students are the Counseling Center, located in Bosch Room 105, 888-2620, and the Student Health Center, located in the lower level of Frisch, 888-2610.

RELATED POLICIES

Event Alcohol Policy

Event Management Policy for External Clients

Event Management Policy for Internal Users

Community Standards. 

2.2.2        Environmental Health and Safety Program

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM

Effective Date:

May 8, 2017

Policy Number:

II – 2.2.2

Supersedes:

Not Applicable.

Issuing Authority:

President

Responsible Officer:

Vice President for Business and Finance

Applicability:

All members of the Canisius College community.

History:

 


PURPOSE

The purpose of this program is to define the policy of Canisius College concerning the environmental health and safety of all students, employees, visitors, and contractors on the college campus and to delegate responsibilities for assuring compliance with appropriate environmental health and safety laws and regulations.

POLICY

It is the policy of Canisius College to promote a safe and healthy environment for employees, students, visitors, volunteers, and contractors, and to comply with state and federal laws and regulations relating to workplace and environmental health and safety.

It is the responsibility of each employee, student, visitor, volunteer and contractor to conduct work, research, instructional courses, and activities in a manner that will not adversely impact themselves, others, the surrounding community, college property, or the environment.  In addition to personal conduct, it is expected that individuals will familiarize themselves with the relevant environmental health and safety policies and procedures related to their work or activities on campus, including those set forth in the college’s Environmental Health and Safety Manual.

DEFINITIONS

Department Safety Officers (DSO)—those individuals responsible for monitoring and assessing safety hazards or unsafe conditions within a department that conducts academic teaching or research activities; facilities support functions; or other activities that utilize hazardous materials or equipment.  A DSO is appointed by the department head and has delegated authority to coordinate department safety program implementation with the Safety, Health, and Environmental Committee.

PROCEDURES/GUIDELINES

Program Oversight

The associate vice president for human resources and compliance oversees the environmental health and safety program at Canisius College.  The Safety, Health, and Environmental Committee advises the associate vice president for human resources and compliance on occupational health and safety matters in conformity with applicable state and federal laws, regulations, codes, and standards.  It is also responsible for recommending changes to the College’s Environmental and Health Safety Manual. 

Environmental Health and Safety Program Manual

Detailed guidelines and procedures in specific environmental health and safety areas, as well as plans for working with specific hazardous materials, must be followed by members of the college community and are published in the college’s Environmental Health and Safety Program Manual.

Role of Department Safety Officers

Department safety officers monitor compliance with environmental and health and safety guidelines and procedures in their specific areas; respond to incidents and report and make recommendations to the Safety, Health, and Environmental Committee related to environmental health and safety issues in those areas; recommend, implement, manage and, when necessary, refine environmental health and safety programs and procedures; provide guidance and technical assistance on interpreting safety guidelines and procedures and identifying and responding to hazards; participate in risk assessments, crisis management planning, and emergency response; and promote best environmental health and safety practices throughout their areas.

Incident Reporting and Investigations

The college has the responsibility to investigate and appropriately report environmental health and safety incidents.  Employees, students, and others affiliated with the college have the responsibility to disclose any activity that may be, or may result in, a violation of any environmental health and safety regulation or policy to an immediate supervisor, the chair of the Safety, Health, and Environmental Committee or other appropriate college official.

All personnel and students are encouraged to immediately notify Public Safety or Facilities Management of any situation that may result in an imminent environmental hazard to persons, property, or the environment.  The college’s response to an environmental health emergency will be consistent with the procedures set forth in the college’s Crisis Management Plan. 

All employees, students, and others affiliated with the college are expected to fully cooperate, and participate as appropriate, in any investigation and remediation of any incidents.

Employees and students who report incidents in accordance with law and college procedures, or who raise questions or concerns about the college’s environmental health and safety policies and procedures will not be penalized by the college.

Sanctions

Any failure to follow this policy, or any of the environmental health and safety procedures and work rules applicable to a particular area, may result in disciplinary action and sanctions, up to and including termination of employment for faculty and staff, or separation for students.

RELATED POLICIES

Crisis Management Plan TBA

Environmental Health and Safety Manual

Whistleblower Policy

2.2.3        Service Animal Policy

SERVICE ANIMALS POLICY

Effective Date:

May 8, 2017

Policy Number:

II – 2.2.3

Supersedes:

Canisius College Service Animals Policy

Issuing Authority:

President

Responsible Officer:

 

Associate Vice President for Human Resources and Compliance and Vice President for Student Affairs

Applicability:

All members of the Canisius College community.

History:

 


PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy is to establish requirements for accessibility, behavior, and treatment of service animals on campus and to support Canisius College’s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

POLICY

Canisius College complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, which states, “No otherwise qualified person with a disability in the United States…shall, solely on the basis of a disability, be denied access to, or the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity provided by any institution receiving federal assistance.”  Canisius intends to provide the broadest possible access to service animals in all of its public areas.

A service animal is not a pet, but can perform some of the functions and tasks that an individual with a disability cannot perform himself or herself.  Animals are considered “service animals” under ADAAA, if they meet the ADDAA’s definition (see Definitions section), regardless of whether they have been licensed or certified by a state or local government. Assistance Animals are not considered service animals.  Basic service animal policy guidelines for Canisius College are set forth in the Procedures/Guidelines Section of this policy.

DEFINITIONS

Griff Center for Academic Engagement – Accessibility Support—Accessibility Support collaborates with individuals, faculty, and staff to ensure that individuals with disabilities have equal access to all Canisius College programs and activities.

Owner—an individual with a disability who uses a service animal as an accommodation on the college’s campus.

Service Animal—the American with Disabilities Act (ADAAA) defines a service animal as “any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability.”   The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability.

PROCEDURES/GUIDELINES

Guidelines Addressing the Use of Service Animals on Campus

Below are basic policy guidelines regarding service animals on campus for Canisius College:

  • A service animal may be excluded from a facility, including a classroom if that animal poses a direct threat to the health of safety of others;
  • A service animal may be excluded from a facility, including a classroom, if that animal’s behavior, such as barking, is disruptive to the other participants within the facility;
  • If a service animal is excluded from a facility, the individual with a disability will be given the option of continued classroom participation, with assistance, within the facility;
  • The service animal must be clean, in good health, with current rabies vaccination;
  • All service animal must be on a leash at all times;
  • All students and college employees must abide by current city ordinances/laws pertaining to licensing and vaccination requirement for service animals.  It is the responsibility of the owner and/or user of the animal to know about these ordinances and/or laws;
  • All owners of service animal are responsible to clean up after and properly dispose of their animal’s feces while on campus.

Failure to adhere to the above guidelines may result in the removal of the service animal from campus and other discipline as applicable. 

While the college does not require members of the college community to register a service animal with the college, individuals may choose to do so as follows:

  • Employees desiring to register a service animal with the college may contact Human Resources;
  • Students residing in the college resident halls desiring to register a service animal with the college may contact the contact the Griff Center for Academic Engagement – Accessibility Support at 716-888-2476;
  • All other persons bringing service animals onto the campus who to desire to register a service animal with the college may contact the Human Resources and/or Public Safety for assistance and further guidance.

In situations where it is not obvious that an animal is a service animal, college employees may inquire whether: (1) the animal is a service animal required because of a disability and; (2) what work or task has the animal been trained to perform.  College employees may not, however, request any documentation for the animal, require that the animal demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person’s disability.

Complaints and Exclusion of a Service Animal

Any member of the college may submit a complaint about a service animal, identifying one or more concerns in the areas listed above.  Persons with concerns may contact a member of Public Safety, Human Resources, or Student Life.  An investigation will be commenced by the appropriate department and a determination will be made with respect to any alleged violations of this policy or corresponding procedures.  The determination will be provided to the owner and the individual submitting the complaint.  If the investigation determines that any provision of this policy and corresponding procedures has been violated by a student, the matter will be referred to Student Life for proceedings consistent with the provisions of the Community Standards.  If the investigation determines that any provision of this policy has been violated by an employee or visitor to the campus, the matter will be referred to Human Resources for further investigation.  In addition to warnings and/or sanctions, a finding substantiating the violation of this policy may also lead to the exclusion of the animal from campus.

RELATED POLICIES

Pets Policy

Service Animal Policy

Use of Non-human Animals in Research, Teaching, and Demonstrations Policy


2.2.4        Smoking and Tobacco Use Policy 

SMOKING AND TOBACCO USE POLICY

Effective Date:

August 26, 2019

Policy Number:

II – 2.2.4

Supersedes:

Smoking Policy

Issuing Authority:

President

Responsible Officer:

 

Associate Vice President for Human Resources and Compliance and Vice President for Student Affairs

Applicability:

All members of the Canisius College community.

History:

Revised policy approved by the Board of Trustees on May 6, 2019.


PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy is to assist in the creation of a healthy and comfortable environment for all students, employees, visitors, and any other members of the college community.

POLICY

It is the policy of Canisius College to provide a smoke and tobacco-free environment on campus.  The use of smoking and tobacco products of any sort shall be prohibited on all college-owned and operated campus grounds, both indoors and outdoors.  This smoking ban does not apply to public rights-of-way (sidewalks, streets) on the perimeter of the campus.  Moreover, the sale, distribution, and sampling of all tobacco products and tobacco-related merchandise is prohibited on all college-owned and operated property and at college-sponsored events.  Littering campus with remains of smoking products is similarly prohibited.

Canisius encourages all users of tobacco, in any form, to quit.  Information on smoking cessation programs is available in the Student Health Center and Human Resources, as well as via the Employee Assistance Program.

It is the responsibility of all members of the campus community to comply with this policy.  Department supervisors are responsible for workplace administration of the policy.  Complaints regarding employee and volunteer non-compliance should be directed to the violating employee or volunteer’s immediate supervisor.  Complaints regarding student non-compliance should be directed to the vice president for student affairs.  All other violators should be reported to Public Safety.

Any member of the college community can voice objections to smoking or tobacco use on campus in violation of this policy without fear of retaliation.

DEFINITIONS

College-Owned and Operated Campus Grounds—include, but are not limited to, all outdoor common and educational areas; all college buildings; college-owned on-campus housing; campus sidewalks; campus parking lots; recreational areas; outdoor stadiums; and college-owned and leased vehicles (regardless of location).

Smoking and Tobacco Use— means inhaling, exhaling, burning, or vaporizing any substance, including but not limited to, tobacco, cloves, liquid nicotine or marijuana solution, or marijuana (e.g., lighted cigarette, lighted cigar, lighted pipe, use of personal vaporizers or vape pens, or any other lighted tobacco, clove, marijuana or concentrate).

Smoking and Tobacco Products—include, but are not limited to, all cigarette and tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars, bidis, kreteks, e-cigarettes, personal vaporizers or vape pens etc.), all smoke-producing products (cigars, hookah, pipe, or electronic inhaler that employs a mechanical heating element, battery, or electronic circuit to heat a liquid nicotine solution contained in a vapor cartridge, such as an electronic cigarette, electronic cigar, electronic cigarillo, or electronic pipe), and smokeless tobacco products.

PROCEDURES/GUIDELINES

Exceptions

Smoking and the use of tobacco products is permitted when traveling in a private vehicle through campus or parked on campus in an unenclosed parking lot while in a vehicle that is not owned or leased by the college.

Any product that has been approved or otherwise certified for legal sale by the United States Food and Drug Administration for tobacco use cessation or other medical purposes and is being marketed and sold solely for that approved purpose is also permitted (e.g., nicotine replacement products such as over-the-counter or prescription nicotine patches, gum, lozenges, inhalers, and nasal sprays, as well as prescription non-nicotine medications).

 Violation of Policy

 Violations of this policy will result in the college taking appropriate disciplinary action against the violator. Disciplinary actions will be taken in accordance with the college’s policies and procedures that apply to the violator.

RELATED POLICIES

Community Standards

Residential Life Standards of Conduct

Owned or Leased Vans and Motor Vehicles Policy

 

2.2.5        Student Health Center Incident Reporting Policy

STUDENT HEALTH CENTER INCIDENT REPORTING POLICY

Effective Date:

May 8, 2017

Policy Number:

II – 2.2.5

Supersedes:

Not Applicable.

Issuing Authority:

President

Responsible Officer:

Vice President for Student Affairs

Applicability:

All members of the Canisius College community.

History:

 


PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy is to describe the steps to be used in the Student Health Center when caring for students, staff, and visitors who report an incident that resulted in an injury or illness.

The goals of this policy are:

  • To ensure proper evaluation and treatment of individuals who experience an incident on campus;
  • To ensure proper reporting of incidents to campus officials; and
  • To protect the health and safety of all campus members and visitors by timely notification of hazards to campus officials.

POLICY

It is the policy of the Student Health Center to evaluate and treat individuals who experience an incident on campus, report such incidents to campus officials, and to protect the health and safety of all campus members and visitors by timely notifying campus officials of hazards in accordance with the procedures set forth in this policy.

DEFINITIONS

Contracted Employees - include food service employees, bookstore employees, and contractors retained to perform construction work.

Incident - any occurrence, which is not consistent with the routine operation of the institution or routine care of a particular individual.  Incidents can cause physical harm or damage to a person that has the potential to cause pain or distress.  Incidents are a result of an unknown cause or a result of an unusual effect of a known cause and therefore are not expected.

PROCEDURES/GUIDELINES

Work Related Incidents

Employees and Student Workers (Including Contracted Employees*)

Employees who experience an incident on campus, either on or off duty, who come to the Student Health Center will be given first aid.  If the injury requires more than first aid, the employee will be referred to Sisters of Charity Hospital Emergency Room, HealthWorks, WNY, or the employee’s private physician.  If the injury/injuries is life or limb threatening, an ambulance should be called to transport the employee to the Sisters of Charity Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

Student Health nursing staff will advise the employee, in writing on the discharge ticket, to report the incident to Human Resources immediately.

Nursing staff will notify the director of student health of the employee incident.

The director of student health will notify Human Resources the name of the employee only.

Students Who Report a Work-Related Incident from an Outside Employer

Students who report a work-related incident that occurred at an off campus place of employment will be given first aid.  If the injury requires more than first aid, the student will be referred to Sisters of Charity Hospital or MASH Urgent Care. If the incident resulted in a life or limb threatening emergency, an ambulance will be called to transport the student to Sisters of Charity Hospital Emergency Room.

Student Health nursing staff will advise the student, in writing on the discharge ticket, to report the incident to their employer immediately and follow all employer recommendations for ongoing medical evaluations.

Non-Work Related Incidents

Students and visitors who report non work related incidents, who seek care in Student Health, will be treated according to department policy. 

Students and visitors who report incidents will be advised by the nurse in writing on the discharge ticket, to report the incident to Public Safety immediately.

Student Health Staff Incident Reporting

Any member of the Student Health Center who experiences an incident on campus must report the incident to the director or assistant director of student health immediately.  The Employee Incident Report Form will be completed and sent to Human Resources.  The Student Health Center employee will be treated as noted above under work related incidents. The director of student health will notify Human Resources of the name of department employee.

RELATED POLICIES

Benefits Required by State and Federal Law Policy

Workplace Accidents and Safety Policy

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